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IACT Focus Areas

The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) focuses on advancing the science of catalysis for the efficient conversion of renewable energy resources into usable forms. IACT is a partnership among world-class scientists at Argonne National Laboratory, Northwestern University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Purdue University, and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Using a multidisciplinary approach involving new catalyst synthesis, advanced characterization, catalytic experimentation, and computation, IACT addresses three catalytic processes that are critical to improving the efficiency for conversion of biomass to fuels: (1) selective hydrogenation of oxygen-containing functional groups, (2) selective removal of hydrogen from sugars, and (3) carbon-carbon (C-C) bond formation.

The grand vision for IACT is to create a knowledge base for these key catalytic transformations that guides efficient deconstruction of biomass and enables highly selective conversion of the resulting oxygenated molecules to fuel components with minimum loss of the precious carbon that photosynthesis fixed to create the biomass. Thus, precise control of reaction pathways is our main mission. Our strategy for doing this revolves around three focus areas:

woodchips, pellets, and logs as examples of biomass that can be converted to fuels.

Woodchips, pellets, and logs are just some examples of biomass that can be converted to fuels. IACT is creating a knowledge base for these key transformations that guides efficient deconstruction of biomass and enables highly selective conversion of the resulting oxygenated molecules to fuel components with minimum loss of the precious carbon that was fixed by photosynthesis to create the biomass.

 

November 2012


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